No Image Available

Seb Anthony

Read more from Seb Anthony

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1705321608055-0’); });

Project Management

default-16x9

What are the key-skills of Project Management
Van Barrett

9 Responses

  1. Project Management
    In my view the key to getting it right is to follow a process – Stepwise.
    Start with (In Outline)
    – Choose the sponsor / team leader / team
    – Clearly identify goals and the parameters of the project
    – Identify Stakeholders & responsibilities
    – Start Risk Assessment
    – Do feasibility study to determine if go / no go
    – Assuming go
    – Do Work breakdown schedule
    – Plan work
    – Set budget
    – Obtain resources
    – Start work / monitor progressand make changes as needed
    – Keep an eye on risks
    – When complete ensure handover & closure takes place
    – Share Learning & have a big party

  2. Project Manager Skills
    Hi Van

    On a project manager’s development programme I undertook a some years’ ago, it was suggested that the essential skills for a PM included Administration, Analysis, Negotiation, Verbal Communication, Written Communication, Listening, Motivating and Deciding. My practical experience of PM has proved this essentially correct.

    We used a questionnaire to assess our skills in these areas which I still have in Word format. If you are interested, let me have your e-mail address and I’ll send it to you.

    Regards

  3. Could I have a copy please Phil?
    Phil,

    Could I have a copy of your questionnaire please? You can get my e-mail by clicking on my name.

    Thanks

  4. project management skills
    The list I put together from talking to effective project managers some years ago, went like this
    *communicating effectively, both sending and receiving info
    *organising workflow to meet deadlines
    *working within the organisational style, though knowing when to be different
    *knowing when to focus on the ‘customer’ of the project, and when to focus on the ‘suppliers’ of the project
    *understanding and resolving conflict
    *building and supporting an effective team
    *managing the resources involved and their flow
    *managing your own energy and time
    *knowing about yourself, your style, when to push and when to ease up

    (in Managing More with Less, p 28)

    In the plan that’s been already mentioned, it’s important to include *clarity about your responsibilities and where they end – the boundaries of the project
    *the possible impact of the project on other people
    * anticipation of possible obstacles and plans to overcome them
    *and obviously the Critical Path, preferable worked through from the end date.

  5. Not sure I can add more
    Van,

    I’m not sure I can add more particularly. However as a practicising Project Manager and PM trainer if you want to discuss further feel free to drop me a mail or call.

    Regards,

  6. Project Management
    I have written my own manual on Project Management and I am more that happy to let you have a copy of this.

  7. PMs need Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills & Experience
    PMs need Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills & Experience

    Knowledge: most of this can be found in the Body of Knowledge for the project management professional bodies (APM and PMI both publish one – and you’l find the contents list helpful)

    Attitudes: research has identified a number of key attitudes for both project and programme managers (look at the free test at http://www.citi.co.uk for some hints – for fuller information, CITI have a number of offerings for both assessment and consultancy [end of commercial])

    Skills: can the PM apply the knowledge in an appropriate way for real situations using the appropriate behaviours for the context (these will vary with the type of project and/or organisation)

    Experience: research suggests that successful PMs have at least 8 years experience in project

  8. Key Skills
    An essential part of any project management is ‘ getting the job done’ – in many projects this fundamental outcome is not looked at with the respect it deserves. I have seen excellent project managers lose sight of this is favour of getting right first the other key skills that others have already listed.

    [email protected]

Newsletter

Get the latest from TrainingZone.

Elevate your L&D expertise by subscribing to TrainingZone’s newsletter! Get curated insights, premium reports, and event updates from industry leaders.

Thank you!